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Safeguarding Disabled Children

Safeguarding Disabled Children Safeguarding Disabled Children

Disabled children need the opportunity to experience sporting opportunities and experiences open to all children in a safe environment. To help achieve this in Rugby League, they and their families may need additional information, help and support. Rugby League clubs, coaches and teachers, as well as relevant voluntary and support staff, will require training and advice to ensure they are inclusive of, and safeguard disabled children.

The WRL Safeguarding Policy reflects the needs to safeguard all children within Rugby League however for disabled children, the WRL recognises the guidance in the government document “Working Together to Safeguard Children” (2006) which states

“Expertise in both Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and in disability has to be brought together to ensure that disabled children receive the same levels of protection from harm as other children”.

The WRL are aware that the most valuable resource within clubs are the employees and volunteers who appreciate the value of Rugby League to disabled children and have the will and desire to ensure they can become fully integrated members of the Rugby League community. Rugby League is committed to meeting the needs of disabled people and to develop opportunities in the Rugby League for both disabled children and adults.

Rugby League is in its infancy in relation to sporting opportunities for disabled participants although there is an enthusiasm for and a commitment to developing more opportunities. Wheelchair rugby had its inception in 2005 and there are currently 2 well established teams with several new clubs in the early stages of development. Tag rugby is more established and there are opportunities for young people with learning disabilities and some physical disabilities to participate in a competition culminating in the weekend festival in South Leeds every September. 2008 will also see the beginning of links with Actionnaires and the RNIB to develop Rugby League for blind and visually impaired children and young people.

The game is in the early stage of the development of Rugby League for disabled people generally and in particular relatively small numbers of disabled children are currently involved in Rugby League. This is therefore an opportune moment for all those involved in developing and facilitating Rugby League for disabled children to simultaneously consider Safeguarding issues so that policies and procedures can be implemented at the outset thereby giving those involved the confidence that the game is starting with a sound understanding of the issues.

The RFL is currently developing a disability strategy which aims to develop appropriate pathways for all disabled players, whether that is via the mainstream game or via one of the derivatives. These crucial decisions will be made in conjunction with the disabled player and all staff involved will ensure that they employ a social model of disability when looking at barriers to participation and will not allow stereotyping and assumptions about the abilities of disabled participants when advising which version of the game they would be encouraged to try.

In order to ensure that there is a greater awareness of the needs of disabled players in order to ensure that they develop to their full potential coaching staff will be encouraged to undertake additional modules and continuous professional development (cpd) units on disability in sport.

MAKING RUGBY LEAGUE ACCESSIBLE AND SAFE FOR DISABLED CHILDREN

Rugby League must be safe and accessible for all children. The RFL Safeguarding Policy is an important tool to assist clubs to safeguard all children from harm within the Rugby League, whether they are disabled or non-disabled.

To achieve accessibility, the WRL has recognised that the Rugby League environment and the rules of the game may need to be modified to meet the needs of some disabled people. For example although wheelchair Rugby League is generally played for 2 x 40 minutes sessions this may be made shorter in order to accommodate the individual needs of disabled players. In addition Tag rugby has been developed which eliminates the contact element and may therefore be more appropriate for some disabled players.

RFL will work with the clubs to ensure their facilities are accessible and will work actively with the Disabled Supporters Association in order to overcome physical barriers to participation. Where appropriate additional or adapted equipment may be provided and Rugby League clubs will work with other organisations with expertise in this field in order to source and access specialist equipment.

To understand and meet the Safeguarding needs of disabled children in your club you need to have a knowledge and understanding of disability.

THE DEFINITION OF DISABILITY

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 2004 defines a disabled person as someone who has a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

Disability can be recognised as:

-        Physical disability (e.g. limitations to dexterity or mobility)

-        Sensory impairment (e.g. visual, hearing)

-        Mental health difficulties

-        Chronic illness (e.g. asthma, epilepsy, diabetes)

-        Medical conditions, which may cause pain or other symptoms, which affect study (e.g. side effects of treatment, poor attention, poor concentration), Asperser’s Syndrome/Autism Spectrum Disorder

-        Specific learning difficulties (e.g. dyslexia, dyspraxia)

-        Any other condition which has a significant effect on an ability to study.

It must be accepted the above classifications can overlap and some children will have more than one disability. 

UNDERSTANDING THE SOCIAL MODEL OF DISABILITY & IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE

Disabled people / person /spectator is the preferred term and the term used by the WRL as this reflect the social model of disability which emphasises that people with impairments are disabled by society not by their impairment. For example "Wheelchair users can’t use the facilities because the venue is inaccessible; therefore, we need to modify the building and the services we provide."

The social model was not developed as some form of “denial” of impairment, it was developed in order to inform society, which includes disabled people, of the real reason that individuals are not able or allowed to take a full and active role in society.

It follows then, if society in general, organisations and those individuals working within them acknowledge, understand and implement the ‘social model’, there would be far less discrimination against disabled people and greater access to services and the society as a whole.

By contrast the medical model perspective rests with the belief that a person’s impairment or medical condition causes the disability. For example "Wheelchair users can’t use the facilities because of their impairment, as it prevents them from getting up the steps at the entrance of the venue". This approach is based on seeing disability or impairment as the problem and as such it does not expect society to take any responsibility for overcoming barriers faced by disabled people. 

STRATEGIES FOR CLUBS TO ADOPT TO ENSURE DISABLED PLAYERS ARE ABLE TO REACH THEIR FULL POTENTIAL

Communication

Clubs should work with the disabled child and their family/carers to understand the disabled child’s individual needs and identify barriers to participation. Once this has been achieved the club should work toward eliminating or overcoming barriers where possible so that the disabled child has an opportunity to be integrated into mainstream Rugby League where possible and when appropriate supported to play one of the many derivatives offered by Rugby League

The child and their parent or carer will have information they can share with the Rugby League club on how best to meet the child’s needs to allow them to access Rugby League. Additionally some childhood disabilities progress with the age of the child and need constant reassessing medically. It is important that Rugby League clubs work continuously with the child and parent or carer to ensure they are kept aware of relevant changes to reduce any increased risk of harm to the child in the sporting venue.

Some children may have multiple disabilities. If so the sport must look at the needs of the child in a holistic manner and define how to meet all the needs, not just the one area of disability.

Avoid assumptions and stereotypes

It is important that club staff do not rely simply on assumptions about who may be vulnerable. This is particularly the case where disability is concerned. Some disabilities, such as dyslexia and mental health needs are `invisible’ and as such it may be less likely that club staff will recognise their needs.

One of the initial barriers to developing good working relationships with disabled children and their families or carers is the fear of causing unintended offence by the use of incorrect or inappropriate language. In order to address this issue please refer to the RFL guidance on inclusive language. Copies can be requested from the Equality and Diversity manager.

Find a balance

Sometimes club staff will find themselves in the difficult situation of balancing the needs on an individual with the needs of other young people and staff at the club. For example Tourette’s is a syndrome that causes the person to often use inappropriate and verbally abusive words in an uncontrollable and unintentional manner. It is known that a number of top sportspersons have this disability and allowances have to be made by others who are involved with them in the sport. In the case of children and young people, the club has to consider the vulnerability of that individual as well as those who hear and observe this behaviour, and consider how they can accommodate children and young people living with this disability whilst at the same time safeguard all its young club members. The key to this is honest communication and discussion with all parties and where necessary education and awareness raising among the young people, their parents and carers and the wider club staff. A flexible and creative approach may also be necessary, at all times maintain the social model of disability uppermost in your mind, this will help you to look at wider barriers – be they physical, social, educational or attitudinal!

 

Staff Training

 

There are a number of training options open to club staff such as the sports coach UK courses Equity in your Coaching and Coaching Disabled Performers.  The WRL is also developing modules as part of its Coaching courses to cover Wheelchair RL.

 

Medical information

 

Within the Safeguarding Policy the WRL identifies the need for Rugby League clubs to have a medical form completed by the parent, carer and, if applicable, the child which includes information regarding the child’s disability. This is also an opportunity to include any other individual needs or difficulties. Players and their parents and carers should be encouraged to complete this section honestly – disability or other health needs does not necessarily prevent someone participating in Rugby League, indeed Rugby League is committed to making the game accessible to everyone and will take positive steps to ensure every effort is made to meet those needs. In order for players to have confidence in this Policy and be honest the RFL will endeavour to identify and promote role models within the game. In addition players will be assured that with full information they will be better able to ensure that the player will be able to meet their full potential and not compromise their health thereby increasing the time they are able to enjoy playing Rugby League

 

The RFL has a medical form (see Safeguarding Policy) that gathers the required information with additional information on any changes in the child’s life situation that may cause a change in behaviour e.g. death of a relative, divorce

 

Remember some disabilities such as asthma may require minimal or no specific action by the club. However the knowledge of that disability will allow the club to have an awareness of what action to take in an emergency i.e. a severe asthma attack brought on by an injury or incident.

Where, following discussions with the player, club and parents/carers it is decided that the mainstream game would not be appropriate or sufficiently meet the needs of the young person and where that decision is free of any discrimination then the club should make every effort to signpost the young person to one of the Rugby League derivatives such as wheelchair and tag rugby.

 

Assessment of need

From the information received on the medical form, and through discussion with the child and their parent or carer, the club can identify how to best meet the child’s needs to enable them to access the sport in full.

Below are some points to consider in completing an assessment of need:

-        Does the club have adequate access for the young person?

-        Does the club have the required facilities (see above)

-        When playing away matches does the host club have required access/facilities?

-        Does the club have the required staff trained?

-        Does the child or young person need additional help from a “support person” to access the Rugby League?

-        What aids are required and can the club provide them. Do the parents have aids that can be used? i.e specialist wheelchairs – charities can help wih this

-        Does the young person need personal care and if so who will provide it? Bear in mind the requirements of Safeguarding children to meet this need.

-        Medication – see above

-        What advice can the parent/carer give to avoid/deal with possible problems in behaviour.

-        What, if any, support services are provided by the local authority or other agencies to enable them to participate in everyday activities including education? Ask for consent from the parent/carer to seek advice or support from these sources

-        How will the club ensure the disabled young person is safeguarded from harm or injury while in the venue?

-        Is an agreement with parents on attending the venue during sessions required?

-        What action should be taken if a medical emergency occurred relating to any disability?

 

N.B. This is not an exhaustive list

It has to be recognised that some medical conditions can be hard to manage in a mainstream club if they place other members at risk of harm. Such decisions to exclude or refuse membership must be taken in line with appropriate guidance from the RFL Equality & Diversity Manager and the Safeguarding Team.  In some cases specialist clubs such as Wheelchair RL clubs may provide the best solution.

DIFFERENT TYPES OF DISABILITY

Chronic illness

Among the more common are asthma, allergies, diabetes, sickle cell anaemia or thallasaemia.

Being diagnosed with a chronic medical condition presents many challenges for both the child and their families. For parents and children having access to information, treatment options and related resources such as sport, can make a significant difference in their quality of life.

Health issues such as severe asthma, diabetes and epilepsy, are likely to require the young person to have regular medication. The Club Welfare Officer and appropriate coaches must be aware of what medication is prescribed as well as what action to take if the child becomes unwell. Rugby Leagues clubs must ensure that, while supporting the child and parent or carer, they do not overstep what is appropriate for the club to undertake in terms of care. Knowledge of what to do and how to cope in an emergency is always important but it may be considered necessary that, in order to safeguard the child, a parent or other responsible adult should always be in attendance. For those illnesses where reaction time is vital, a plan should be developed with the child and parent/carer to deal with emergencies so that a clear line of action and responsibility can be followed.

It may be appropriate, only with the expressed permission of the individual concerned and or their parent or carer to share some information in order to raise awareness and challenge myths and fears among their peers or club staff.  For example a young person with diabetes may be required to inject insulin and they may prefer to make this explicit to their peers rather than risk being caught injecting insulin with the risk of misguided assumptions about drug abuse!  Safe arrangements should be made for storage of medication if the parent/carer is not present throughout activities.

Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

There are a group of lifelong developmental disabilities, affecting how a person relates to or communicates with other children and adults. Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders experience difficulties known as “the triad of impairment – social interaction, social communication and imagination”. The National Autism Society recognises that “the prevalent rate of ASD of 1 in 110 indicates that all services (with children) should expect to come into contact with young people on the spectrum”.

In Rugby League we need to recognise that ASD can cause problems not only for the individual concerned but for both fellow team members and coaches that are involved with them. It has to be remembered that this is not an issue of “poor behaviour” but a behaviour pattern that is part of ASD.

All clubs will need to look at what they can and can’t provide to meet an individual child’s needs and complete a risk assessment with a decision on whether that risk is acceptable and manageable, and allows the club to safeguard the needs of both the individual concerned and other club members to whom the club has a duty of care.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) & Tourette’s Syndrome

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attention deficit disorder (ADD) refer to a range of behaviours associated with poor attention span including impulsiveness, restlessness and hyperactivity, as well as inattentiveness, and may make it more difficult for children to learn or obey instructions and also cause misunderstandings when socializing. 

Tourette’s syndrome is often linked to or part of the symptoms of ADHD.  Tourette’s may cause children to use inappropriate and verbally abusive words in an uncontrolled and unintentional manner. 

Clubs will need to liaise with parents/carers and possibility professionals who help the player outside the club to draw up a plan to support the player within the club.  The plan will need to be agreed by all concerned, eg coaches, parents and the child.

Learning Disabilities

Children with learning disabilities may require more help to learn new skills.  Coaches need to be made aware of the player’s disability so that they understand that the child may need more help to participate in training sessions and games.  It is important that parents communicate with the club to prevent assumptions being made that the child is being disruptive or naughty.

Progressive or Potentially Terminal Illnesses

With children with progressive illnesses such as cancer it is important to ask open questions that will allow the disabled person and /or their parents and carer to share information openly about any progressive illnesses that may be active or in remission but could have an impact in terms of possible health and safety issues.

Progressive illnesses by there very nature are likely to change with time; the young person’s ability to undertake the Rugby League may become more limited and more specialist provisions may be required to enable them to remain in your club. For example a child being able to maintain his involvement in a Rugby League club for as long as possible is of primary importance following a diagnosis of a potentially terminal illness such as cancer.

AWARENESS OF INCREASED VULNERABILITY TO ABUSE

The RFL Safeguarding Policy states:

-        The RFL is committed to ensuring that all children who play Rugby League have a safe positive and fun experience, whatever their level of involvement.

-        The welfare of all children is paramount.

-        All children within Rugby League, regardless of age, gender, race, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, ability or disability, have the right to enjoy the game in an environment safe from abuse of any kind.

 

To meet the duty of care to safeguard children Rugby League clubs should recognise that both historical and recent research which recognises that disabled children can be at greater risk of abuse and that the presence of multiple impairments appears to increase the risk of both abuse and neglect.

Working Together to Safeguard Children (HM Government 2006) states

“The available UK evidence on the extent of abuse among disabled children suggests that disabled children are at increased risk of abuse, and that the presence of multiple disabilities appears to increase the risk of both abuse and neglect. Disabled children may be especially vulnerable to abuse for a number of reasons”.

Some disabled children may:

-        have fewer outside contacts than other children;

-        receive intimate personal care, possibly from a number of carers, which may both increase the risk of exposure to abusive behaviour, and make it more difficult to set and maintain physical boundaries;

-        have an impaired capacity to resist or avoid abuse;

-        have communication difficulties which may make it difficult to tell others what is happening;

-        be inhibited about complaining because of a fear of losing services;

-        be especially vulnerable to bullying and intimidation; and/or

-        be more vulnerable than other children to bullying and abuse by their peers.

Working Together further states that “Safeguards for disabled children are essentially the same as for non-disabled children”.

Welfare Officers, coaches and club helpers must have an awareness of the need to safeguard all children and specifically recognise additional risks to disabled children.

The club must be aware that:

-        Disabled children and young people may be more likely to suffer from BULLYING and EMOTIONAL ABUSE from both young people and adults. Sometimes the “abuser” does not realise the hurt being caused by inappropriate comments but sometimes they do and the bully is picking on the person least able or likely to complain. Disabled children and young people may be subject to PHYSICAL assaults of a minor or major nature. They may be less able to remove themselves from a situation; an adult may become frustrated by their lack of response, or may be the outcome physical bullying.

-        SEXUAL ABUSE of those in society who are unable to either stop or understand acts that are taking place is unfortunately not rare. Good Safeguarding practice within the club, especially in terms of the need for a young person to be assisted in personal care, either during the sports  activity or in the changing room, can help prevent the possibility of such abuse arising.

-        A disabled young person may be left in an inappropriate situation or not be seen to receive appropriate care. The club officers and members must always report concerns if a parent or carer is viewed as failing to give proper care and attention to meet the needs of a disabled child.

-        Disabled children can be EXCLUDED by inappropriate acts of individuals or the club itself. The RFL are an inclusive organisation and expect clubs to do all they can to be inclusive to all children.

 

Welfare Officers and other responsible adults in the club can assist in Safeguarding disabled children by:

 

-        Attending appropriate Safeguarding vulnerable groups training and where possible additional disability awareness training

-        making it common practice to help disabled children make their wishes and feelings known in respect of their care and treatment;

-        making sure that all disabled children and young people know how to raise concerns if they are worried or angry about something, and giving them access to a range of adults with whom they can communicate.

-        Ensuring that disabled children with communication difficulties should have available to them at all times a means of being heard;

-        Making an explicit commitment to, and understanding of all children’s safety and welfare among providers of services used by disabled children;

-        Ensuring close contact with families, and a culture of openness on the part of services; and

-        Providing guidelines and training for staff on good practice in intimate care; working with children of the opposite sex; handling difficult behaviour; consent to treatment;

-        Producing anti-bullying strategies;

Responding appropriately to any reported incidents and following guidance policies and procedures as laid down by RFL. This will ensure consistence of approach and ensure that all cases are given equal consideration.

ACCESS AND FACILITIES

The Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (DDA) states that where a provision, criterion or practice applied by a Club or any physical feature of a building occupied by a club places a disabled person who is or who seeks to be a member of the club at a substantial disadvantage, in comparison with members of the club who are not disabled persons then it is the duty of the club to  take such steps as it is reasonable, in all the circumstances of the case, for it to have to take in order to prevent the provision, criterion or practice, or feature, having that effect.

The majority of Rugby League clubs fall under the jurisdiction of the DDA and as such clubs should consider the following:

1      Does the club have adequate access for the young person concerned? If not can it be adjusted to meet the child’s needs?

2      Is the club accessible and does it have accessible toilet/shower facilities. Consider the needs of people which visual and hearing impairments as well as wheelchair access. i.e. using contrasting colours around door frames, information on audio format , hearing loops in public and training areas. Plain English and use of symbols in information and publicity as well as trying not to use print font any less than Ariel 14

3      Are the common areas available to the disabled young person i.e. the club house?

4      Is there proper access to the field of play for all disabled young people as players, match officials, coaches or spectators

5      Does the child or young person need special adaptations within the venue to meet their needs to access Rugby League.

And:

6   Would it be deemed a “reasonable” measure for a club to provide for the required changes? This is essentially about balancing the legal requirement to make adjustments with constraints facing the club, i.e. costs, limitations of building etc. If the club encounters any difficulties it may be expedient to contact the Rugby League Disabled Supporters Association who will provide advice and mediation if required, or contact other disability groups – see end of this document for a list of disability organisations.

Where to go for more information?

Disabled children need the opportunity to experience sporting opportunities and experiences open to all children in a safe environment. To help achieve this in Rugby League, they and their families may need additional information, help and support. Rugby League clubs, coaches and teachers, as well as relevant voluntary and support staff, will require training and advice to ensure they are inclusive of, and safeguard disabled children.

 

The WRL Safeguarding Policy reflects the needs to safeguard all children within Rugby League however for disabled children, the WRL recognises the guidance in the government document “Working Together to Safeguard Children” (2006) which states

 

“Expertise in both Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and in disability has to be brought together to ensure that disabled children receive the same levels of protection from harm as other children”.

 

The WRL are aware that the most valuable resource within clubs are the employees and volunteers who appreciate the value of Rugby League to disabled children and have the will and desire to ensure they can become fully integrated members of the Rugby League community. Rugby League is committed to meeting the needs of disabled people and to develop opportunities in the Rugby League for both disabled children and adults.

Rugby League is in its infancy in relation to sporting opportunities for disabled participants although there is an enthusiasm for and a commitment to developing more opportunities. Wheelchair rugby had its inception in 2005 and there are currently 2 well established teams with several new clubs in the early stages of development. Tag rugby is more established and there are opportunities for young people with learning disabilities and some physical disabilities to participate in a competition culminating in the weekend festival in South Leeds every September. 2008 will also see the beginning of links with Actionnaires and the RNIB to develop Rugby League for blind and visually impaired children and young people.

 

The game is in the early stage of the development of Rugby League for disabled people generally and in particular relatively small numbers of disabled children are currently involved in Rugby League. This is therefore an opportune moment for all those involved in developing and facilitating Rugby League for disabled children to simultaneously consider Safeguarding issues so that policies and procedures can be implemented at the outset thereby giving those involved the confidence that the game is starting with a sound understanding of the issues.

 

The RFL is currently developing a disability strategy which aims to develop appropriate pathways for all disabled players, whether that is via the mainstream game or via one of the derivatives. These crucial decisions will be made in conjunction with the disabled player and all staff involved will ensure that they employ a social model of disability when looking at barriers to participation and will not allow stereotyping and assumptions about the abilities of disabled participants when advising which version of the game they would be encouraged to try.

 

In order to ensure that there is a greater awareness of the needs of disabled players in order to ensure that they develop to their full potential coaching staff will be encouraged to undertake additional modules and continuous professional development (cpd) units on disability in sport.

 

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